Quick Answer: What Does Toile De Jouy Mean?

What is toile used for?

Toile comes from the French for a “linen cloth” or “canvas” for painting on.

The same word is used to describe a garment made to test a pattern.

These test garments are usually made in unbleached woven cotton called calico or a basic unbleached cotton single jersey..

Is toile fabric out of style?

Perhaps historically considered an old-fashioned fabric found in stuffy, traditional homes, toile is enjoying a modern revival — and turning heads.

What does Jouy mean?

Toile de Jouy, (French: “fabric of Jouy”, ) also called Jouy Print, cotton or linen printed with designs of landscapes and figures for which the 18th-century factory of Jouy-en-Josas, near Versailles, Fr., was famous.

Who invented toile?

Christophe-Philippe OberkampfThe man behind the brand, Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf, is better known for the street and Métro station named after him in the 11th arrondissement of Paris.

Is Toile a Scrabble word?

TOILE is a valid scrabble word.

What is a toile print?

Toile de Jouy was a specific type of linen printed with romantic, pastoral patterns in a single color—usually black, blue, or red—on an unbleached fabric. Although the word toile means fabric, the word toile has evolved to also refer to the original design aesthetic of the fabric.

How do you pronounce toile de Jouy?

Toile de JouyToile is pronounced “twall” and got its name from a French term meaning “linen cloth” or “canvas”Toile is used as an abbreviation of the term toile de Jouy (twäl-də-ˈzhwē), a term that translates to “cloth of Jouy”Toile de Jouy is named after Jouy-en-Josas, France where, in 1760, the factory Oberkampf was founded.More items…•

What is French toile?

Toile is a fabric, from the French word meaning “linen cloth” or “canvas”, particularly cloth or canvas for painting on.

Where can I buy toile fabric?

Amazon.com: Toile Fabric.

What is a toile in sewing?

A toile (also known as a ‘muslin’) is basically a draft version of a garment. A toile is normally made from a cheaper fabric, so that you can test the fit of a particular garment before cutting into your real (and normally more expensive) fabric.